H. G. Wells

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H. G. Wells Book Series

When the Sleeper WakesThis anthology is a thorough introduction to classic literature for those who have not yet experienced these literary masterworks. For those who have known and loved these works in the past, this is an invitation to reunite with old friends in a fresh new format. From Shakespeare s finesse to Oscar Wilde s wit, this unique collection brings together works as diverse and influential as The Pilgrim s Progress and Othello. As an anthology that invites readers to immerse themselves in the masterpieces of the literary giants, it is must-have addition to any library.
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The Country of the Blind, and Other StoriesThe early short stories of an essential 20th century literary personageHerbert George Wells was perhaps best known as the author of such classic works of science fiction as The Time Machine and War of the Worlds. But it was in his short stories, written when he was a young man embarking on a literary career, that he first explored the enormous potential of the scientific discoveries of the day. He described his stories as "a miscellany of inventions," yet his enthusiasm for science was tempered by an awareness of its horrifying destructive powers and the threat it could pose to the human race. A consummate storyteller, he made fantastic creatures and machines entirely believable; and, by placing ordinary men and women in extraordinary situations, he explored, with humor, what it means to be alive in a century of rapid scientific progress.For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.
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Tales of Space and TimeThe Crystal Egg The Star (audiobook from librivox) A Story of the Stone Age (audiobook from librivox) 1. Ugh-lomi and Uya 2. The Cave Bear 3. The First Horseman 4. Uya the Lion 5. The Fight in the Lion\'s Thicket A Story of the Days to Come 1. The Cure for Love 2. The Vacant Country 3. The Ways of the City 4. Underneath 5. Bindon Intervenes The Man Who Could Work Miracles
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The Food of the Gods and How It Came to EarthTwo scientists devise a compound that produces enormous plants, animals — and humans! The chilling results are disastrous.
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Tono-BungayThis anthology is a thorough introduction to classic literature for those who have not yet experienced these literary masterworks. For those who have known and loved these works in the past, this is an invitation to reunite with old friends in a fresh new format. From Shakespeare s finesse to Oscar Wilde s wit, this unique collection brings together works as diverse and influential as The Pilgrim s Progress and Othello. As an anthology that invites readers to immerse themselves in the masterpieces of the literary giants, it is must-have addition to any library.
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The First Men in the MoonThe novel tells the story of a journey to the moon by the impecunious businessman Mr Bedford and the brilliant but eccentric scientist Dr Cavor. On arrival, Bedford and Cavor find the moon inhabited by a race of moon-folk the two call "Selenites." The novel can also be read as a critique of prevailing political opinions from the turn of the century, particularly of imperialism.
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Twelve Stories and a Dreamime minister yesterday, and he, bless his heart! didn\'t look particularly outsize, on the very first occasion. Conceive it! Filmer! Our obscure unwashed Filmer, the Glory of British science! Duchesses crowd upon him, beautiful, bold peeresses say in their beautiful, clear loud voices--have you noticed how penetrating the great lady is becoming nowadays?--\'Oh, Mr. Filmer, how DID you do it?\' "Common men on the edge of things are too remote for the answer. One imagines something in the way of that interview, \'toil ungrudgingly and unsparingly given, Madam, and, perhaps--I don\'t know--but perhaps a little special aptitude.\'" So far Hicks, and the photographic supplement to the New Paper is in sufficient harmony with the description. In one picture the machine swings down towards the river, and the tower of Fulham church appears below it through a gap in the elms, and in another, Filmer sits at his guiding batteries, and the great and beautiful of the earth stand around him, with Banghurst massed mo
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The Sleeper AwakesThe story of a man who sleeps for two hundred and three years and wakes up in a completely transformed London. Because of compound interest on his bank accounts, this man has become the richest individual in the world. A fanatic socialist and author of prophetic writings, the main character awakes to see his dreams realized, and the future revealed to him in all its dystopian horror.
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The War in the AirThe first three chapters of The War in the Air relate details of the life of Bert Smallways and his extended family in Bun Hill – a (fictional) former Kentish village which had become a London suburb within living memory (in many ways similar to Bromley where Wells was born). The story begins with Bert\'s brother Tom, a stolid greengrocer who views technological progress with suspicion and apprehension (which would turn out to be all too well founded) and their aged father, who recalls with longing the time when Bun Hill was a quiet village and he had driven the local squire\'s carriage. However, the story soon focuses on Bert who is an unimpressive, not particularly gifted, unsuccessful young man with few ideas about larger things – but far from unintelligent. He has a strong attachment to a young woman named Edna, and works as a helper and later a partner in a bicycle shop. When bankruptcy threatens one summer, he and his partner abandon the shop, devise a singing act ("the Desert Dervishes"), and resolve to try their fortunes in English sea resorts. As chance would have, their initial performance is interrupted by a balloon which lands on the beach before them, and which turns out to contain one Mr. Butteridge. Butteridge is famous for his successful invention of an easily manoeuvrable fixed-wing aircraft whose secret he has not revealed and that he is seeking to sell to the British government or, failing that, to Germany. Prior to Butteridge, nobody had succeeded in producing a practical heavier-than-air machine, only a few awkward devices of limited utility such as the German "Drachenflieger", which had to be towed aloft and released from an airship. Butteridge\'s invention is a major breakthrough, as it is highly manoeuvrable, capable of both very fast and very slow flight, and requires only a small area to take off and land, reminiscent of the later autogyro. By accident Bert is carried off in Butteridge\'s balloon, and discovers Butteridge\'s secret plans on board it. Bert is clever enough to appraise his situation, and when the balloon is shot down in a secret German "aeronautic park east of Hamburg," Bert intends to pass himself off as Butteridge to sell the secret. However, he has stumbled upon the German air fleet just as it is about to launch a surprise attack on the United States - and Prince Karl Albert, the author and leader of this plan, decides to take him along for the campaign. The Prince, world-famous as "The German Alexander" or Napoleon, is a living manifestation of German Nationalism and boundless imperial ambitions, his personality as depicted by Wells in some ways resembling that of Kaiser Wilhelm II. Bert\'s disguise is soon seen through by the Germans, and – narrowly avoiding being summarily thrown overboard by the furious Prince – he is relegated to the role of a witness to the true horror of war.
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KippsOrphaned at an early age, Artie Kipps is stunned to discover upon reading a newspaper that he is the grandson of a wealthy gentleman—and the inheritor of his fortune. Thrown dramatically into the upper classes, he struggles to learn the etiquette and rules of polite society. But, as he soon discovers, becoming a "true gentleman" is neither as easy nor as desirable as it first appears. Kipps is a hilarious tale of one man's struggle for selfimprovement and a witty satire of pretension.
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Ann VeronicaAn introduction by the author of The Duchess explores why Wells's classic tale of one woman's fight against the stifling conventions of Edwardian England is as relevant today as in 1909Stong-willed, reckless, and fiercely independent, Ann Veronica Stanley is determined to be a "Person," to work, love, and, above all, to live. Walking away from her stifling father and the social conventions of her time, she leaves drab suburbia for Edwardian London and encounters an unknown world of suffragettes, Fabians, and free love. But it is only when she meets the charismatic Capes that she truly confronts the meaning of her new found freedom. Exploring the conflict between female empowerment and the sacrifices people make for love, this novel caused a sensation—damned in the press and preached against from the pulpits—when it was first published in 1909, due to Wells' groundbreaking treatment of female sexuality.About the AuthorH. G. Wells (1866–1946) is regarded as one of the all-time greatest authors of science fiction. Flora Fraser is the author of such historical biographies as Pauline Bonaparte, Princesses: The Six Daughters of George III, and The Unruly Queen: The Life of Queen Caroline.
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The Country of the Blind and other Selected StoriesHerbert George Wells was perhaps best known as the author of such classic works of science fiction as The Time Machine and War of the Worlds. But it was in his short stories, written when he was a young man embarking on a literary career, that he first explored the enormous potential of the scientific discoveries of the day. He described his stories as "a miscellany of inventions," yet his enthusiasm for science was tempered by an awareness of its horrifying destructive powers and the threat it could pose to the human race. A consummate storyteller, he made fantastic creatures and machines entirely believable; and, by placing ordinary men and women in extraordinary situations, he explored, with humor, what it means to be alive in a century of rapid scientific progress.
Views: 68